Police To Use Automatic Facial Recognition Sunglasses To Watchlist People

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Sometimes I have trouble coming up with a title for one of my articles, but this one came easy because the two companies involved in this article helped create it.

A New York based company called Vuzix along with a UAE software company called NNTC, worked together to produce the world's first automatic facial recognition sunglasses for law enforcement.

Not only did they create the world's first automatic facial recognition sunglasses but they purposely made them to resemble Oakley sunglasses. Which makes it harder for people to tell if they are being spied on.

The above video warns that police will have access to a database of at least one million faces.

According to NNTC, they created the iFalcon Face Control Mobile sunglasses specifically for law enforcement.

"The bodycam or smart glasses screen the crowd to match faces against a database of violators, missing people or suspects. Once there is a match, the solution retrieves relevant information from the database and instantly sends an alert via AR smart glasses." (Click here to see iFalcon's infographic)

How will police really use iFalcon sunglasses you ask? To watchlist or white list people of course.

The iFalcon Face Control Mobile brings face recognition capabilities anywhere, even without the network of CCTV cameras covering every inch of the city. It proves particularly effective in:

  • Detects people at public events, sports facilities and in other crowded areas: violators, ‘watchlisted’ individuals and missing people
  • Public surveillance in transportation stations, airports, subway and other transport facilities
  • Monitoring immigrants and identification of violators and imposters at border customs control
  • Verification of identity according to ‘white list’
  • Preventing terrorism, espionage and unauthorized access to sensitive areas

Back to how I created my title; a company purposefully creates spying sunglasses to help law enforcement watchlist individuals. It does not get anymore disturbing than that or does it?

CEO explains U.S. military connections to iFalcon sunglasses

If you can get through the crappy music and Erica Blackwell fawning over CEO Paul Travers, the first two minutes of the above video spells out his connections to the U.S. military and how he purposely designed their new iFalcon Face Control sunglasses to be indistinguishable from Oakley sunglasses.

A recent Vuzix press release also does a great job of explaining how police will use their new iFalcon Face Control sunglasses.

"Vuzix Blade Smart Glasses, which are nearly indistinguishable from everyday sunglasses, utilize the built-in camera on the glasses to detect faces and then transmits the information to a wearable portable computer over a wireless channel. The portable computer processes face images and compares them with faces from the database stored locally to find the match. Once there is a match, the solution retrieves relevant information from the database and instantly sends an alert to the wearer via the Vuzix Blade AR Smart Glasses."

A pro-industry website called DealerScope claims that iFalcon sunglasses could also be used by the public to identify someone who's name you forgot.

"Imagine a day where you’d never have to experience one of those awkward encounters where you bump into someone who clearly remembers who you are, calls you out by name, and yet, there you stand, unable to connect a name with the face you’re staring at."

Using facial recognition to identify old acquaintances, really? Sorry, DealerScope we are not buying it.

Time after time we see companies with suspect ties to the military and law enforcement try and push facial recognition onto an unsuspecting public but this is not one of those times. 

Giving law enforcement facial recognition sunglasses with the ability to watchlist or white list people in real-time must be stopped before we find ourselves living in mirror-image of China.

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